The Need

clean, safe, water project, Zambia, Steve EversIt's hard to believe, but there are people living around the world without access to usable water. So people in remote places use what they can get.

That often means digging in the dirt until water is found. Of course animals find it too. They soil it and make it further unfit for human consumption, but people consume it anyway. 

If you're lucky enough to have a river or form of running water nearby, you'll spend most of your time hauling the water from the river to your home in heavy buckets. Sometimes people walk miles to get to the nearest access point.

You never know who is soiling the water upstream, either. Rivers are often inhabited by hippos, crocodiles, or other dangerous predators posing physical danger to trespassers. 

Clean Water

Young girls haul heavy buckets of water from the Zambezi River in Zambia back to their village.

Drinking water, Lukulu, Zambia

Bathing, Zambezi River, Lukulu, Zambia

You never know who is soiling the water upstream.

ITMI has identified a remote area in Zambia, isolated from most of civilization between the Angola border and the Zambezi River. The river floods for part of the year, making it impossible to bring a vehicle across.

The rest of the year, it's still difficult and unaffordable, so the locals remain mostly isolated. 

The locals use the unsanitary water from the croc-infested Zambezi River or they dig until they find water, which is also unsanitary and soiled by animals.

Because of the lack of water, the area lacks other services because professionals - such as Doctors - don't want to go there. 

Description

Village life can be deeply impacted with the provision of clean, safe water that is accessible nearby. Now, pastors, doctors and other professionals can come and stay if needed.

The villagers can devote the time they once spent hauling water to raising gardens or other life-improving endeavors. 

They no longer fear for their lives when retrieving water daily. 

This deep impact opens wide the doors to share with the villagers the story of the God who created them, cares for them, made salvation available to them through Christ and wants a relationship with them. 

The impact isn't just about the new convenience. It is deeply touching for the people of these isolated villages to know they aren't forgotten. Someone cares about them and their needs. 

ITMI - through the generosity of our supporters -  has been able to revolutionize villages in this area through the digging of wells. When a well is gifted, there is an inauguration ceremony where the gospel is preached. Many give their lives to Him through these ceremonies.

Preaching, Steve Evers, Zambia, Lukulu, Water Wells, Clean Water

ITMI Director, Steve Evers, preaches the Good News at a well inauguration ceremony.

Preaching, Zambia, Lukulu

Preaching, Steve Evers, Zambia, Lukulu, Water Wells, Clean Water

Preaching, Steve Evers, Zambia, Lukulu, Water Wells, Clean Water

Preaching, Steve Evers, Zambia, Lukulu, Water Wells, Clean Water

Prayer, Zambia, Lukulu, Water Wells, Clean Water

Many gave their lives to Jesus through these ceremonies.

Discipleship is built into the process in two ways.

First, the village is told they can express their gratitude for this wonderful gift by using it to bless others around them - sojourners or villages that may not have one - and also being good stewards of the gift so others in their village can flourish because of it.

Second, ITMI partner, Johan Leach, lives in the area. He and his teams of trained Zambian evangelists visit the villages regularly, preaching the gospel and discipling them.

$3500 Revolutionizes a Village

A well can be drilled for $3500. For $3500, a village can be changed forever. Lives preserved. Health and flourishing made much more possible. 

By funding the digging of a well you can:

  1. Provide life-giving water for an entire village.
  2. Open the door for the gospel to be welcomed with open arms in a village
  3. Save lives by reducing the spread of disease through unsanitary water. 
  4. Make way for doctors, teachers and people providing services to come to the village.
  5. Reduce the risk of women and children being mauled by crocodiles.

 

Goals

  • Declare and demonstrate the Good News in an isolated and forgotten area.
  • Improve the lives of as many as possible with clean, safe water. 

Who’s Involved

  • ITMI partner, Johan Leach, and his teams of local believers and their church located in a settlement called Chavuma on the East side of the Zambezi river.

Latest News

4 Things You Should Know About Life in Remote Villages

Africa, Villages

“I used to think, ‘All for one and one for all,’ is what village life is all about, right? That the villages are populated by the “noble savage” and lead a connected, unified community life,” says ITMI’s Timothy Keller. But unfortunately, this version of village life may be popular in Hollywood and children’s tales, its simply not what Timothy has found after over a decade of ministry in African villages. “Rural Africa is

World “Peace”

Johan Leach, Zambia

Some of Johan’s thoughts on world peace, inspired by a quiet Sunday morning on the banks of the Zambezi River in Zambia.

The “Other Side” of the Tracks – How Paul Crossed it and Earned Trust

Paul and Molly, India, clean, safe, water

Many have died just attempting to cross the mainline train tracks and return home from getting water, but no safety precautions – not even a simple caution sign – have been enacted. Because those lives “don’t matter.” Slum residents literally live among the trash, as if they’ve accepted that it is what they are. They were completely forgotten and devalued. Trash. Until…

Armed with the Word of God…They Set Out

Johan Leach, Zambia

With joy in their hearts and the wind of the Holy Spirit in their “sails,” (oars!) two four man teams set out in canoes from remote Chavuma, Zambia. Their rations were packed. Their tents were secured.

Dear Team: 5 Villages Have Access to Clean, Safe Water!

Dear Team, Steve Evers, Zambia, Johan Leach

…nonetheless, Johan Leach and I set out to visit and dedicate the five new water wells just completed last month in the remotest of remote villages in far western Zambia.

Dear Team: A Surprising Difference Between Barotse Plains Villages

Zambia, Johan Leach, Steve Evers

It was a discovery that surprised me. There just isn’t that much space west of the Zambezi River in Zambia. There aren’t that many people there. Yes, there are several hundred thousand villagers spread out amongst plethora of small villages that dot the desolate land mass wedged between the river and the Angola border. But still, they all pretty much live the same, eat the same and display many of the same beautiful physical features. And yet they…

Our Clean Water Project is Back!

clean water, Zambia

A few years ago, the plight of the Zambian villages isolated between Zambezi River and the Angola border came to our attention. They were so remote that they lacked most of the necessities for life, but the most concerning was their lack of access to water.

Dear Team: You Sure See A Lot of Strange Things When You’re a Missionary

Zambia, Steve Evers, Johan Leach, Dear Team

Being a missionary sure exposes you to a lot of strangeness. Strange cultures. Strange customs. Strange perceptions. Strange ethics. Strange multiplied. It’s true even for the missionaries in big city areas. The strangeness multiplies exponentially as you move further from the densely populated areas into the bush.