LATEST NEWS

Praise the Lord! Casa Dorca’s urgent need for a large amount of firewood was…

Praise the Lord, this month a donor added $1000USD to the $5000 USD that we shared had already been given last month! …

In our May issue, we shared that our Casa Dorca children have an urgent need. Supporters have given about…

Casa Dorca Children's Home, Romania

Casa Dorca’s Urgent Need Met!

Praise the Lord! Casa Dorca’s urgent need for a large amount of firewood was…

Casa Dorca, Romania

Donors Stand Between Orphans and Winter

Praise the Lord, this month a donor added $1000USD to the $5000 USD that we shared had already been given last month! …

Casa Dorca, Romania

Update: Casa Dorca’s Urgent Need for Firewood

In our May issue, we shared that our Casa Dorca children have an urgent need. Supporters have given about…

Like most of the people living in this area, ITMI’s Casa Dorca Children’s Home relies on a boiler system that runs on wood to heat their approximately 2000 square meter building.

We have not yet seen the end of 2020, but most can agree that 2020 is a year like no other.

“The only happy time we had at the orphanage was when we slept,” remembers Visinel Balan, now an adult. Visinel grew up in one of the many state-run orphan institutions during Nicholas Ceausescu’s dictatorship in Romania. …

Casa Dorca, Romania

Our Casa Dorca Children Have an Urgent Need

Like most of the people living in this area, ITMI’s Casa Dorca Children’s Home relies on a boiler system that runs on wood to heat their approximately 2000 square meter building.

casa dorca, romania

DEAR TEAM: How the Lord Used Donors Like You to Provide in the Nick of Time

We have not yet seen the end of 2020, but most can agree that 2020 is a year like no other.

Casa Dorca, Romania

Provide a Loving, Christian Home for Romanian Orphans!

“The only happy time we had at the orphanage was when we slept,” remembers Visinel Balan, now an adult. Visinel grew up in one of the many state-run orphan institutions during Nicholas Ceausescu’s dictatorship in Romania. …

THE CONTEXT

“The only happy time we had at the orphanage was when we slept,” remembers Visinel Balan, now an adult. Visinel grew up in one of the many state-run orphan institutions during Nicholas Ceausescu’s dictatorship in Romania.

Considered the most repressive government in the Eastern Bloc at the time, Ceausescu rose to power in 1965 and was overthrown in 1989.

In an interview with France 24, Balan reported being beaten for failure to learn to count or memorize the alphabet.

“It was the worst nightmare you could imagine,” he said, his taut facial muscles unable to hide the leftover fear and trauma.

Alina, another now-grown orphan interned in a Ceausescu era Romanian institution, remembers, “Sometimes to punish me, they would stop feeding me.”

Another orphan put it this way, “Those places were the slaughterhouses of souls.”

Alin, now in his 30s, who also grew up in state-run, secular Romanian children’s institutions, has been on the street since he was 18. After the orphanage, he wasn’t ready for acclimation to the outside world. After life in an orphanage, drug and alcohol addictions are common.

After Ceausescu was overthrown, around 100,000 orphans were discovered “emaciated and living in appalling conditions.”

Their bones protruding, some without a thread of clothing, covered with sores and moving with almost animal-like movements on the floor. Most of those children had been abandoned by impoverished parents driven to their knees by a vile, unjust and corrupt system.

The plight of orphans in Romania didn’t improve much in the years between Ceausescu’s fall and the turn of the millennium.

Today, thirty years after the totalitarian reign of terror ended, Romania still has the largest number of abandoned children in Europe. Though it is now rare for orphanages to use rope to tie children up, they have switched to tranquilizing drugs, reports Romanian senator, Vlad Alexandrescu, “it’s more efficient and less visible,” he explains.

In 2015, a correspondent from the GlobalPost reported visiting an orphanage in Romania, and wrote that the children “talked about beatings and thefts from their food as routine.”

As a result, many are pushing for the closure of institutions, pushing to replace them with foster care and smaller group homes, like ITMI’s Casa Dorca Children’s Home. If they are successful, Casa Dorca’s ministry will be more crucial than ever.

Quietly tucked away in a tiny town called Prilipet in impoverished rural Romania, Casa Dorca Children’s Home stands in stark contrast to these heartbreaking and disturbing testimonies.

Casa Dorca, Romania, Orphanage

Casa Dorca is in a small, rural town called Prillipet.

Social_Rural Prillipet

Casa Dorca, Romania, Orphanage

Though scenic, Prillipet is a harsh, rural area, where survival is tough. 

The soft, colorful warmth of this Casa Dorca bedroom is so different from the colorless, cold rooms in state-run institutions.

Many of the children who are reached by Casa Dorca Children's Home come from the toughest backgrounds, and have been through things no child should have to experience.

One Casa Dorca alumni observed, “This place feels more like a family than an orphanage.” As a child at Casa Dorca, he was surprised when the older children helped and cared for him. He was accustomed to being bullied by the bigger, stronger children at the previous orphanage.

The children at Casa Dorca are well-clothed in appropriate, seasonal garments. The facility is clean and cared for. They eat vegetables regularly. They attend church and are encouraged to pursue their gifts, such as joining the church orchestra.

They attend school and receive help with their homework from older children, helpers or volunteers.

Casa Dora, Romania

A Casa Dorca boy works on his homework.

Ionel Iovescu, Casa Dorca, RomaniaCasa Dorca’s current leadership is highly dedicated.

Though they could obtain higher-paying jobs and better lives for their own families, they faithfully serve because they care deeply about the children and love the Lord Jesus.

“I came here because the Lord gave me this opportunity to work for Him...it’s a chance for us to show the Lord our gratitude. I would do anything for my kids,” said Ionel Lovescu, the Director at Casa Dorca, “Now I can make a difference for these kids here.”

In addition to seeing the Gospel in action through the love and care of the believing volunteers and staff, they are presented with the Good News throughout their time at the home.

“We cannot force them to trust in Christ,” writes Ionel, “but everything we do is to plant the seeds of the Gospel and show them the love of God every day. Through your prayers, along with ours, we hope that they will cling to the Gospel in their lives, as many have throughout Casa Dorca’s history.”

Many don’t leave as soon as they turn 18. When they do, they are capable of leading normal, productive lives. Some even return to help out!

The smiles emanating from healthy faces say it all. They declare the depth of the impact that can be made in the lives of these young people.

“None of this is possible without people who are willing to be used by God to be sponsors of our work at Casa Dorca,” Ionel acknowledges.

WHAT YOUR SUPPORT DOES

Provides a Family for Children in Need

Your support allows Casa Dorca to provide for the ongoing needs of the children who are placed in their care.

Demonstrates and Declares God's Love to Hurting Children

The children who live at Casa Dorca are surrounded by God's love and the Good News that the Lord wants a relationship with them. Many of the children respond to Him in faith and obedience.

Demonstrates the Gospel to the Community

Ensuring that orphans are cared for demonstrates the Gospel to the entire community of Prilipet, as they watch believers sacrifice and take action on behalf of vulnerable children.

HISTORY

Casa Dorca was built in 1926 by a group of small, meagerly resourced churches from the rural area around the village of Prilipet as the first Baptist Orphanage in Romania. This group funded the rescue of children from the streets and provided them with a home and a loving family.

In 1950, the Communists threw the children out of the orphanage and marched them down the street to the local authorities where they left them to fend for themselves against the cold and harsh Romanian elements.

The children sang as they marched to the police station, “It’s so good to know we have a Father in heaven.

Later that year, the orphanage was turned into a bakery.

Through the work of ITMI founders Bill and Harriet Bathman and Dr. Nick Gheorgita, the father of long-time ITMI partner, Ema Ban, ITMI supporters had the opportunity to help reopen the home in 1996, seven years after the fall of Ceausescu.

Casa Dorca has been providing a loving, Christian home and family atmosphere for children since then.

During this unusual and perhaps fearful, difficult or challenging time of the Coronavirus pandemic, we need daily reminders that we can trust our good and faithful Lord and Savior, no matter what we face. Here’s how three of our partners have seen Him at work, revealing Himself to be more than trustworthy during these unusual times. 

Our partners have been reaching out and sharing some truly encouraging verses and thoughts with regard to the Coronavirus pandemic. Their unique perspectives and experiences plus a variety of cultural backgrounds means they’ve shared encouragement we may not have thought to remind ourselves of.

He was just five when tragedy struck his family. They lived in rural Romania, where many work their fingers to the bone to eek out a living for their families. When Marius’ mother passed away, his father, an alcoholic, couldn’t care for Marius and his two sisters.

3 stories of His trustworthiness during the pandemic

3 Stories of His Trustworthiness During the Pandemic

During this unusual and perhaps fearful, difficult or challenging time of the Coronavirus pandemic, we need daily reminders that we can trust our good and faithful Lord and Savior, no matter what we face. Here’s how three of our partners have seen Him at work, revealing Himself to be more than trustworthy during these unusual times. 

Encouraging Words and Verses from our Partners

Encouraging Words and Verses from ITMI Partners

Our partners have been reaching out and sharing some truly encouraging verses and thoughts with regard to the Coronavirus pandemic. Their unique perspectives and experiences plus a variety of cultural backgrounds means they’ve shared encouragement we may not have thought to remind ourselves of.

Casa Dorca, Romania

Marius’ Story: How God’s Seed Grew and Blossomed after Tragedy

He was just five when tragedy struck his family. They lived in rural Romania, where many work their fingers to the bone to eek out a living for their families. When Marius’ mother passed away, his father, an alcoholic, couldn’t care for Marius and his two sisters.

As she hurried after a social worker and away from her father’s violent alcohol-induced abuse, Elena cast a furtive glance over her shoulder at the house as they left. It was the last place they’d seen their mother before she passed away just weeks earlier. Would her father follow and find them?

Nestled in the rolling countryside of beautiful but rugged rural Romania is ITMI’s Casa Dorca Children’s Home. Casa Dorca is more than an orphanage. Casa Dorca is a family. At Casa Dorca, the older children don’t bully the younger ones, they watch out for them. At Casa Dorca, the children are raised with grace, not […]

Elena and Alexandra – Would their abusive father follow them to their new home?

As she hurried after a social worker and away from her father’s violent alcohol-induced abuse, Elena cast a furtive glance over her shoulder at the house as they left. It was the last place they’d seen their mother before she passed away just weeks earlier. Would her father follow and find them?

Romania, Casa Dorca

How Casa Dorca Built a Family Environment this Summer

Nestled in the rolling countryside of beautiful but rugged rural Romania is ITMI’s Casa Dorca Children’s Home. Casa Dorca is more than an orphanage. Casa Dorca is a family. At Casa Dorca, the older children don’t bully the younger ones, they watch out for them. At Casa Dorca, the children are raised with grace, not […]